(a) Mature Calypso bulbosa plant without a coral-shaped rhizome. (b) Mature Calypso bulbosa plant with a coral-shaped rhizome.

The modified underground architecture enhances carbon gains through not photosynthesis but fungal parasitism

Suetsugu, Kenji; Matsubayashi, Jun Green coloration is a defining feature of the plant kingdom, and plants are mostly autotrophic, i.e. they make their own nutrients through photosynthesis. However, several hundreds of plants have lost their photosynthetic ability and have evolved to depend entirely on mycorrhizal fungi (known as full mycoheterotrophy). Since photosynthesis is a fundamental process for plant survival, its loss is one of the … Continue reading The modified underground architecture enhances carbon gains through not photosynthesis but fungal parasitism

Growth chamber experiment testing the influence of different plant neighbourhoods of M. truncatula on its fungal microbiota

Plant neighbours shape fungi assemblages associated to roots in focal plants at early growth stage

Mony, Cendrine; Gaudu, Valentin; Ricono, Claire; Jambon, Olivier; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), microorganisms associated with plant roots, significantly affect plant nutrition and health. Empirical and experimental records show a certain degree of host-preference in plant-AMF interactions, leading to particular AMF assemblages associated with different species. But in the real world, a plant is not alone but generally coexists with others. Here we test … Continue reading Plant neighbours shape fungi assemblages associated to roots in focal plants at early growth stage

A microbial predator: the fruiting body of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Photo courtesy of Tyler Larsen.

Microbial predators also have a hunting strategy, just like big cats

Shi, Yijing; Shu, Longfei; He, Zhenzhen; Guan, Xiaotong; Yang, Xueqin; Tian, Yuehui; Zhang, Siyi; Wu, Chenyuan; He, Zhili; Yan, Qingyun; Wang, Cheng When you think about top predators, you may picture big cats like lions and tigers, or crocodiles and the great white shark. In the microbial world, bacteria are the most abundant prey. For them, protists, a group of single-cell eukaryotic microbes, are their … Continue reading Microbial predators also have a hunting strategy, just like big cats