Damselfishes swim among the coral branches in the mid-day sun at the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. (Photo: Fredrik Jutfelt)

Too hot to eat – why aquatic animals reduce feeding during warming

Fredrik Jutfelt, Tommy Norin, Eirik Asheim, Lauren Rowsey, Anna Andreassen, Rachael Morgan, Timothy Clark, Ben Speers-Roesch Aquatic animals reduce feeding when water temperatures become too warm, but the cause of their reduced appetite is unknown. We propose a new hypothesis that explains the physiological mechanism causing the reduced feeding.Water-breathing animals, such as fish, have the same body temperature as the water surrounding them. Therefore, when … Continue reading Too hot to eat – why aquatic animals reduce feeding during warming

Coral degredation impairs learning of non-predators by Whitetail damselfish

Chivers, Douglas; McCormick, Mark; Faken, Eric; Edmiston, Jake; Ferrari, Maud The threat of predation is pervasive in the life of most prey animals. Prey must quickly assess the identity of all animals that they encounter. Many animals are predators, but many are not, and being able to quickly distinguish between the two is crucial for potential prey. If young animals can learn the identity of … Continue reading Coral degredation impairs learning of non-predators by Whitetail damselfish

The experimental setup at the Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology that maintained 5 distinct nutrient treatments required an extensive amount of tubing. Photo credit: M. Fox

Strict coral hosts prevent their endosymbionts from over-indulging in nutrients

Michael D. Fox, Craig E. Nelson, Thomas A. Oliver, Zachary A. Quinlan, Kristina Remple, Jess Glanz, Jennifer E. Smith, Hollie M. Putnam Reef-building corals are very resourceful when it comes to acquiring the nutrients they need to survive. This is because most coral reefs occur in naturally nutrient-limited environments. One way that corals have adapted to this limitation is a symbiotic relationship with microscopic algae … Continue reading Strict coral hosts prevent their endosymbionts from over-indulging in nutrients