Personality in deer neonates is already evident at birth and is linked to the hormones accumulated in mothers’ womb

Bawan Amin, Dómhnall J. Jennings, Adam F. Smith, Matthew Quinn, Srivats Chari, Amy Haigh, Devorah Matas, Lee Koren, Simone Ciuti The field of animal personality has been flourishing in the past decades, focusing on individual differences in behaviour. Although it is quite evident that individuals behave differently from each other, the origins of these consistent differences are still unclear. It is challenging to study personality in wild animals, and most of our knowledge … Continue reading Personality in deer neonates is already evident at birth and is linked to the hormones accumulated in mothers’ womb

Coral degredation impairs learning of non-predators by Whitetail damselfish

Chivers, Douglas; McCormick, Mark; Faken, Eric; Edmiston, Jake; Ferrari, Maud The threat of predation is pervasive in the life of most prey animals. Prey must quickly assess the identity of all animals that they encounter. Many animals are predators, but many are not, and being able to quickly distinguish between the two is crucial for potential prey. If young animals can learn the identity of … Continue reading Coral degredation impairs learning of non-predators by Whitetail damselfish

Two female fruit flies compete over access to a cap containing high-value food

Younger, less sexually active males make females fight each other more

Bath, Eleanor; Buzzoni, Daisy; Ralph, Toby; Wigby, Stuart; Sepil, Irem Mating changes female behaviour and physiology across a wide range of animals, with these changes induced by components of the male ejaculate, such as sperm and seminal fluid proteins. However, males can vary significantly in their ejaculates, due to factors such as age, mating history, or feeding status. This male variation may therefore lead to … Continue reading Younger, less sexually active males make females fight each other more

Juvenile burrowing owls in Idaho, USA, Photo Credit: Darren Clark

Incubation behaviours of burrowing owls are shaped by nest temperature and trade-offs with offspring quality

Carl Lundblad, Courtney Conway Ecologists have long sought to understand why reproductive effort varies across and within species, because such variation underlies important principles of population regulation that are relevant to the conservation and management of wildlife populations. Animals have finite energetic resources to invest in reproduction, which they must balance against other activities including those related to their own self maintenance and survival. Avian … Continue reading Incubation behaviours of burrowing owls are shaped by nest temperature and trade-offs with offspring quality

Large group of humpback and blue whales feeding near the surface © Dave Hurwitz

Humpback and blue whale “super-groups” near dense, consistently distributed krill patches

David E. Cade, S. Mduduzi Seakamela, Ken P. Findlay, Julie Fukunaga, Shirel R. Kahane‐Rapport, Joseph D. Warren, John Calambokidis, James A. Fahlbusch, Ari S. Friedlaender, Elliott L. Hazen, Deon Kotze, Steven McCue, Michael Meÿer, William K. Oestreich, Machiel G. Oudejans, Christopher Wilke, Jeremy A. Goldbogen On Dec. 16, 1892, William S Bruce, a scientist aboard a whaling vessel near South Georgia Island on the edge … Continue reading Humpback and blue whale “super-groups” near dense, consistently distributed krill patches

Free-ranging male and female American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) in courtship (Credit: Kristen Zemaitis).

The immune costs of testosterone: can males break even?

Ezenwa, Vanessa; LaVere, Ashley; Hamlin, Heather; Lowers, Russell; Parrott, Benjamin When you think about animal courtship, you may picture an ostentatious male strutting around to impress a group of females, like a peacock displaying its tail feathers; or two males fighting for a female’s favor, like two rams butting heads to show their strength. Although elaborate displays and acts of aggression may help a male … Continue reading The immune costs of testosterone: can males break even?

The first author (Dylan Gomes) took this photo of an orb-weaving spider (Larinioides patagiatus) on her web during the experimental work reported here.

Whitewater river noise alters orb-weaving spider abundance, behaviour, and insect capture rates.

Dylan G.E. Gomes, Thomas Hesselberg, and Jesse R. Barber The world is a noisy place, yet as visual creatures, humans have largely ignored its potential role as an important niche component in ecology. Only recently has it gained broad attention, as the negative effects of human-made noise (such as the noise from highway traffic) on wildlife have been demonstrably large. Yet, an important question remains … Continue reading Whitewater river noise alters orb-weaving spider abundance, behaviour, and insect capture rates.

Animals can choose their mates based on the choices of others, which can influence dispersal and local adaptation

Manuel Sapage, Susana A. M. Varela & Hanna Kokko Moving away from one’s birthplace is fraught with difficulties. Not only is the movement through unknown areas potentially dangerous; even if one survives the move, the new place will be less familiar than home. These statements do not only describe human feelings; they describe the challenge of migration to any animal species. For an individual’s locally … Continue reading Animals can choose their mates based on the choices of others, which can influence dispersal and local adaptation

Animals with enhanced armor are more likely to win fights

Zachary Emberts and John J. Wiens Many animals often fight with other members of their species. Individuals may fight over food, shelter, or territory, but fights between males over access to females for mating are especially widespread . Many of the most striking and unusual features of animals are associated with these mating-related fights, including the horns of beetles and the antlers of deer. But … Continue reading Animals with enhanced armor are more likely to win fights

A male wire-tailed manakin perched on his display perch, the branch where he performs the acrobatic displays that are thought to inform female mate-choice decisions.

Assessing patterns of biological aging in an avian gymnast, the wire-tailed manakin

Ben J. Vernasco, Roslyn Dakin, Ariana D. Majer, Mark F. Haussmann, T. Brandt Ryder and Ignacio T. Moore Telomeres are segments of DNA located at the terminal ends of eukaryotic chromosomes and are composed of consecutive repeats of a specific nucleotide sequence. Telomeres are dynamic as the number of repeated sequences can change over the course of an individual’s lifetime. An individual’s telomere dynamics depend … Continue reading Assessing patterns of biological aging in an avian gymnast, the wire-tailed manakin